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Apple senior vice presidents must testify in Google antitrust trial, rules judge

Highlights
  • Apple's SVP must testify in Google federal antitrust case
  • Federal judge blocked Apple's latest effort to quash testimony subpoenas
  • Apple has already provided over 125,000 documents for the case
  • Apple and Google relationship to be examined as part of the case

Three Apple executives – including two senior vice presidents – must testify as witnesses in a federal antitrust case brought forward against Google after the executives’ efforts to be dismissed as witnesses were blocked, according to reporting by Reuters.

The three named Apple executives required to testify are Senior Vice President of Services Eddy Cue, Senior Vice President of Machine Learning and AI Strategy John Giannandrea, and Vice President of Corporate Development Adrian Perica. Reuters reports that the executive trio previously argued that forcing them to testify was “duplicative” and “unduly burdensome,” especially since they had previously cooperated with Apple reportedly disclosing more than 125,000 documents at a prior stage of the case. Apple’s motion to quash the trial subpoenas also mentions that the above-named executives have already “provided over 21.5 hours of deposition testimony over four days.”

U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia Amit Mehta has blocked on Monday Apple’s formal attempt to quash the executives’ testimony subpoenas. The case – which the US Justice Department is bringing forward against Google on the basis of antitrust and monopolistic practices, does not name Apple as a defendant. Nevertheless, the Justice Department has stated that Apple’s relationship with Google in which the latter pays the former a significant fee to be the default search engine on Safari “will be a central issue at trial.”

Apple’s legal team has cautioned that the trial testimony could potentially lead to the unintentional disclosure of their most highly competitive information. In a formal document, Apple has expressed its intention to protect details related to business negotiations, confidential contract terms, and any future product developments.

The exact figure that Google pays Apple to be the default search engine on Safari has never been publicly disclosed, but recent estimates peg the figure at $20 billion dollar as recently as 2022, with the sum quickly rising on an annual basis throughout the last decade.

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Editor's Pick

Omar Moharram

Omar Moharram

Omar is Senior Editor at Supercharged and an Apple devotee since his early teens. He graduated with a computer engineering degree in 2022, which aids him in his technical content writing. Outside of work, he can often be found critiquing music or a film, or tinkering with a bass.

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Who are we?

Supercharged is not just another news outlet. We’re a platform on a mission to offer personalized and ad-free news directly to you. Discover more of Supercharged.

Apple senior vice presidents must testify in Google antitrust trial, rules judge

Highlights
  • Apple's SVP must testify in Google federal antitrust case
  • Federal judge blocked Apple's latest effort to quash testimony subpoenas
  • Apple has already provided over 125,000 documents for the case
  • Apple and Google relationship to be examined as part of the case

Three Apple executives – including two senior vice presidents – must testify as witnesses in a federal antitrust case brought forward against Google after the executives’ efforts to be dismissed as witnesses were blocked, according to reporting by Reuters.

The three named Apple executives required to testify are Senior Vice President of Services Eddy Cue, Senior Vice President of Machine Learning and AI Strategy John Giannandrea, and Vice President of Corporate Development Adrian Perica. Reuters reports that the executive trio previously argued that forcing them to testify was “duplicative” and “unduly burdensome,” especially since they had previously cooperated with Apple reportedly disclosing more than 125,000 documents at a prior stage of the case. Apple’s motion to quash the trial subpoenas also mentions that the above-named executives have already “provided over 21.5 hours of deposition testimony over four days.”

U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia Amit Mehta has blocked on Monday Apple’s formal attempt to quash the executives’ testimony subpoenas. The case – which the US Justice Department is bringing forward against Google on the basis of antitrust and monopolistic practices, does not name Apple as a defendant. Nevertheless, the Justice Department has stated that Apple’s relationship with Google in which the latter pays the former a significant fee to be the default search engine on Safari “will be a central issue at trial.”

Apple’s legal team has cautioned that the trial testimony could potentially lead to the unintentional disclosure of their most highly competitive information. In a formal document, Apple has expressed its intention to protect details related to business negotiations, confidential contract terms, and any future product developments.

The exact figure that Google pays Apple to be the default search engine on Safari has never been publicly disclosed, but recent estimates peg the figure at $20 billion dollar as recently as 2022, with the sum quickly rising on an annual basis throughout the last decade.

TOPICS: , ,
Share this Article
note icon

Did you know?

Easily add Supercharged to your Home Screen and stay informed on the go! Get instant updates and breaking news stories via push notifications directly on your iPhone and Apple Watch. Just tap the share icon, then "Add to Home Screen," and be the first to know.

Have a tip for our newsroom? Securely reach out to us and tell us what you know. Your insight and information are invaluable to the work we do. Click here.

Have a tip for our newsroom? Securely reach out to us and tell us what you know. Your insight and information are invaluable to the work we do. 

Editor's Pick

Omar Moharram

Omar Moharram

Omar is Senior Editor at Supercharged and an Apple devotee since his early teens. He graduated with a computer engineering degree in 2022, which aids him in his technical content writing. Outside of work, he can often be found critiquing music or a film, or tinkering with a bass.

Read More

Craig Federighi

Age: 63
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