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Apple cautions against global consequences of UK’s proposed surveillance law reforms

Apple has issued a strong statement against proposed amendments to the United Kingdom‘s Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) according to a new report by Ars Technica. These changes, Apple warns, could have far-reaching consequences for user privacy and security around the world.

The IPA was initially enacted in 2016 to ensure that UK officials have lawful access to user data to investigate crimes such as child sexual exploitation and terrorism. However, the proposed amendments, which are currently being debated in the House of Lords, would require any company that fields government data requests to notify officials of any updates they planned to make that could restrict the UK government’s access to this data, including updates impacting users outside the country.

Apple has expressed deep concern over these proposed changes, arguing that they would “place users’ privacy and security at risk.” The tech giant has even threatened to leave the UK market and to remove iMessage and FaceTime if the amendments are passed, as they could force Apple to “secretly veto new user protections globally, preventing us from ever offering them to customers.”

The UK government, on the other hand, maintains that these changes do not provide powers for the Secretary of State to approve or refuse technical changes, but simply require companies to inform the Secretary of State of relevant changes before they are implemented. The Home Office has also claimed that “these changes do not directly relate to end-to-end encryption.”

However, privacy advocates and tech companies remain skeptical, as they believe that the amendments could undermine end-to-end encryption and transform private companies into “arms of the surveillance state.” Furthermore, the proposed changes could potentially conflict with EU and US laws, including the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which is considered the world’s strongest privacy law.

As the debate over the proposed amendments continues, it is essential to consider the potential global implications of these changes. The outcome of this debate could significantly impact not only UK users, but also users worldwide, as they could be deprived of important new privacy and security features.

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Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei

Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei

Abdul Raouf is a reporter in the Apple Newsroom, where he translates news into insightful and relatable stories. Abdul believes words hold magic and have power often ignored. You can find him between tweets or book pages.

Read More

Who are we?

Supercharged is not just another news outlet. We’re a platform on a mission to offer personalized and ad-free news directly to you. Discover more of Supercharged.

Apple cautions against global consequences of UK’s proposed surveillance law reforms

Apple has issued a strong statement against proposed amendments to the United Kingdom‘s Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) according to a new report by Ars Technica. These changes, Apple warns, could have far-reaching consequences for user privacy and security around the world.

The IPA was initially enacted in 2016 to ensure that UK officials have lawful access to user data to investigate crimes such as child sexual exploitation and terrorism. However, the proposed amendments, which are currently being debated in the House of Lords, would require any company that fields government data requests to notify officials of any updates they planned to make that could restrict the UK government’s access to this data, including updates impacting users outside the country.

Apple has expressed deep concern over these proposed changes, arguing that they would “place users’ privacy and security at risk.” The tech giant has even threatened to leave the UK market and to remove iMessage and FaceTime if the amendments are passed, as they could force Apple to “secretly veto new user protections globally, preventing us from ever offering them to customers.”

The UK government, on the other hand, maintains that these changes do not provide powers for the Secretary of State to approve or refuse technical changes, but simply require companies to inform the Secretary of State of relevant changes before they are implemented. The Home Office has also claimed that “these changes do not directly relate to end-to-end encryption.”

However, privacy advocates and tech companies remain skeptical, as they believe that the amendments could undermine end-to-end encryption and transform private companies into “arms of the surveillance state.” Furthermore, the proposed changes could potentially conflict with EU and US laws, including the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which is considered the world’s strongest privacy law.

As the debate over the proposed amendments continues, it is essential to consider the potential global implications of these changes. The outcome of this debate could significantly impact not only UK users, but also users worldwide, as they could be deprived of important new privacy and security features.

Share this Article
note icon

Did you know?

Easily add Supercharged to your Home Screen and stay informed on the go! Get instant updates and breaking news stories via push notifications directly on your iPhone and Apple Watch. Just tap the share icon, then "Add to Home Screen," and be the first to know.

Have a tip for our newsroom? Securely reach out to us and tell us what you know. Your insight and information are invaluable to the work we do. Click here.

Have a tip for our newsroom? Securely reach out to us and tell us what you know. Your insight and information are invaluable to the work we do. 

Editor's Pick

Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei

Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei

Abdul Raouf is a reporter in the Apple Newsroom, where he translates news into insightful and relatable stories. Abdul believes words hold magic and have power often ignored. You can find him between tweets or book pages.

Read More

Craig Federighi

Age: 63
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