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Meta implements new fee increase for boosted posts on iOS apps following Apple policy update

Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei
Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei - Apple Reporter
3 Min Read

Meta has announced an adjustment to its pricing structure for boosted posts within its iOS apps. This change directly coincides with a recent policy update implemented by Apple, which extends its App Store commission of 30% to encompass in-app purchases like boosted posts.

Previously, Meta facilitated all financial transactions associated with boosted posts, irrespective of the platform used. However, under Apple’s revised policy, advertisers utilizing Facebook and Instagram’s iOS applications will now be subject to billing through Apple’s in-app purchase system. This system automatically deducts a 30% commission from the total ad payment before any applicable taxes are levied.

Meta emphasizes that this price increase solely stems from Apple’s policy and is not an independent decision on their part. They offer an alternative for those seeking to circumvent the additional fee: purchasing boosts directly through Facebook or Instagram’s websites on desktop or mobile browsers. This method effectively bypasses Apple’s in-app purchase system and avoids the associated commission.

For those who prefer the convenience of boosting directly within the iOS apps, further modifications have been implemented. Advertisers will now be required to pre-load their accounts with funds prior to purchasing boosts. This pre-loading process also incurs Apple’s 30% commission, consequently augmenting the overall cost of boosting on iOS devices.

Meta acknowledges the potential ramifications of this change for small businesses and influencers who heavily rely on boosted posts for promotional purposes. They reiterate their commitment to maintaining the feature despite the added costs, highlighting its significance for discoverability and audience reach.

This situation exemplifies the ongoing discourse surrounding App Store policies and in-app purchase fees. Apple maintains its stance, asserting that boosted posts constitute a digital service within their app ecosystem and thus fall under their standard commission structure. Meta, alongside other companies, has voiced dissent against these policies, advocating for greater flexibility and more equitable commission models.

As the debate continues to unfold, the ultimate impact on app developers, advertisers, and consumers remains to be determined.

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Meta implements new fee increase for boosted posts on iOS apps following Apple policy update

Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei
Abdul Raouf Al Sbeei - Apple Reporter
3 Min Read

Meta has announced an adjustment to its pricing structure for boosted posts within its iOS apps. This change directly coincides with a recent policy update implemented by Apple, which extends its App Store commission of 30% to encompass in-app purchases like boosted posts.

Previously, Meta facilitated all financial transactions associated with boosted posts, irrespective of the platform used. However, under Apple’s revised policy, advertisers utilizing Facebook and Instagram’s iOS applications will now be subject to billing through Apple’s in-app purchase system. This system automatically deducts a 30% commission from the total ad payment before any applicable taxes are levied.

Meta emphasizes that this price increase solely stems from Apple’s policy and is not an independent decision on their part. They offer an alternative for those seeking to circumvent the additional fee: purchasing boosts directly through Facebook or Instagram’s websites on desktop or mobile browsers. This method effectively bypasses Apple’s in-app purchase system and avoids the associated commission.

For those who prefer the convenience of boosting directly within the iOS apps, further modifications have been implemented. Advertisers will now be required to pre-load their accounts with funds prior to purchasing boosts. This pre-loading process also incurs Apple’s 30% commission, consequently augmenting the overall cost of boosting on iOS devices.

Meta acknowledges the potential ramifications of this change for small businesses and influencers who heavily rely on boosted posts for promotional purposes. They reiterate their commitment to maintaining the feature despite the added costs, highlighting its significance for discoverability and audience reach.

This situation exemplifies the ongoing discourse surrounding App Store policies and in-app purchase fees. Apple maintains its stance, asserting that boosted posts constitute a digital service within their app ecosystem and thus fall under their standard commission structure. Meta, alongside other companies, has voiced dissent against these policies, advocating for greater flexibility and more equitable commission models.

As the debate continues to unfold, the ultimate impact on app developers, advertisers, and consumers remains to be determined.

TOPICS: ,
Share this Article
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